One of the many nice, new things about the Uniface 10 Development Environment is the Code Container. Each of your development objects, like components, entities and fields, has its own container that houses all of its triggers, operations and entries, generically called modules. [caption id="attachment_6581" align="alignnone" width="474"] Uniface 10: Code Containers[/caption] With this new way of organizing code, Uniface 10 provides ProcScript code inheritance in a very clear consistent way; code inheritance is purely on the level of the individual module. Simply put: a ProcScript module defined at a specific level, overrides any implementation that module might have at a more generic level. Or, from a different perspective: if you do not implement a ProcScript module at a specific level, Uniface will fall back to the implementation of that module at the nearest (inheritance-wise) more generic level. For triggers, the most generic level is really very generic: it is the built-in default trigger behavior. For most triggers the default behavior is to do nothing, but some triggers do have real default behavior. For example, if you omit an entity’s trigger create at all levels, Uniface still adds an occurrence when the user presses ^ADD_OCC. The code containers, and the uniform way of code inheritance that comes with them, make Uniface 10 a real pleasure to work with, especially in combination with the Compiled Modules Inspector, which you find at the right-hand side of the Component Editor’s Write Script worksheet. It shows all modules that were compiled into the component, wherever they came from. A simple double-click on any of them moves you right into the code container of the object where that code was defined. I love it!

This page has no comments.