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During the deployment session from the Uniface Lectures, we covered Uniface 64 bit deployment for Windows in the morning session (not in the afternoon because it took to much time, the videos are available to watch on our YouTube channel though). 

We had a few really interesting questions, I’ve worked the answers into the text below and I dug up an old posting from the old Frontline site, and used that as the basis. 

The oldest Uniface PAM (Product Availability Matrix) I could find was from Uniface 6.1, and with that old version we  delivered 64 bit support on DEC Alpha hardware with Uniface 6.1. OpenVMS, and DEC Unix ports of Uniface. I remember seeing one of the DEC Unix workstations here in the Amsterdam Lab, running the Motif GUI and thinking how advanced it was, how fast it was and I wanted one. Always dangerous to wish for more, I ended up with a Mac on my desk a week later. 

For a number of releases we focused on Uniface server versions for 64 bit, think IBM AIX, HP-UX, Intel Titanium hardware and so forth.  

It was in 2012 that we delivered a 64 bit Windows server version, delivering it in Uniface 9.5.  

It took us a long time, and to be honest, I recall have a few conversations on the topic over the years, and from an out and out technical perspective, the view was that there were few perceived benefits when compared to the 32 bit version to justify the investment to make it happen. I should mention that we had done some clever things with compiler switches to enable memory addressing for a number of releases. 

A Windows 64 bit Uniface client was a different story, and was quite a significant project.  Clearly there were overlaps with the Windows Server (technically they share a lot of common source), but the GUI layer needed a lot of work. We had to refactor a lot of code, as we had a lot of legacy (technical debt) from older versions of Uniface. The name Uniface originated from Universal Interface, and it was possible to develop one Uniface app and deploy it on those old GUI platforms which we used to support thanks to the Uniface specific widgets such as the unifield.  (I’m sure some of us who have been around Uniface for a long time remembers Uniface on Mac, Motif, OS/2 and Windows 3.x.)  There was a lot of old code to clean up and/or remove, and we also have to keep those legacy widgets operational. 

A few additional challenges included our use of automated test tools which didn’t support 64 bit platforms, which also forced our journey to replace them and use Ranorex for our testing. (I’ve covered this in the forums and talked at a few user groups on this topic.)  

We delivered a Windows 64 bit client with Uniface 9.6 in December 2012. We’ve had some good feedback, I recall talking to a customer in the UK, and their comment was that it just seems more ‘fluid’. I talked about this with one of the architects, and the view is that this is probably as a result of the refactoring, possible the additional memory capabilities, but it’s great to get positive feedback. 

It’s available for deployment rather than development, as we have a few external pieces of functionality in the developer, for example the DSP Editor which are not available as a 64 bit product. 

The HTML control we delivered in Uniface 9.6 is also currently restricted to 32 bit. But this will change, it’s based on Chromium (sometimes know as CEF) from Google, and the sources were (finally) updated to 64 bit and we have been working on getting that into Uniface 9.7, and will be part of the Uniface 9.7.02 update which we are finalising. That was a challenge to get working, changes to threading models and API’s meant some rework and lots of testing, but it’s pretty well code complete. 

The Uniface 10 IDE uses that same HTML control extensively, so the move to CEF3, now opens the way to deliver a 64 bit developer. There will be a significant Uniface 10 release in September, but this is something for another posting next month.    

 

1 Comment

  1. It's nice but full of nostalgy to read about Uniface 6.1...remembering it with its pie frontend... Thanks Adrian to share these lines with us about 64bit version history; IMHO times are coming to have it as base version for many Unifacers.